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the memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
debate. lar larry correia, thank you. >> it's been years since dr. martin luther king gave the "i have a dream" speech. and his niece, alvita king reflects on her uncle's legacy here in . >> mike: and five decades ago, segregation was very much alive in parts of america, a time when a black man couldn't buy a bus ticket at the same window that a white man bought his and couldn't wait for the the bus in the same room as whites and it's important to remember as we do this weekend, the man who led the charge in segregation. >> dr. martin luther king, jr. was a baptist minister from atlanta, georgia. he fought to overturn the jim crowe laws not with violence, but peace. >> we seek nonviolence and passive resistance and still determined to use the weapon of love. >> mike: that was in alabama, where dr. king was leading the montgomery bus boycott to end the days where blacks had to give up their seats for whites, the boycott lasted more than a year until a court put an end to segregation on buses. through the leadership conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the
the charge in segregation. >> dr. martin luther king, jr. was a baptist minister from atlanta, georgia. he fought to overturn the jim crowe laws not with violence, but peace. >> we seek nonviolence and passive resistance and still determined to use the weapon of love. >> mike: that was in alabama, where dr. king was leading the montgomery bus boycott to end the days where blacks had to give up their seats for whites, the boycott lasted more than a year until a court put an end to segregation on buses. through the leadership conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealous. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
as our first african american president takes his second oath of office. we honor dr. martin luther king day, as well. president obama is a reflection of the accomplishments of this civil rights leader. there he is. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. some of the ones that push mutual funds with their names on them -- aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder -- isn't that a confl
second oath of office. we honor dr. martin luther king day, as well. president obama is a reflection of the accomplishments of this civil rights leader. there he is. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. >>> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our fore bearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all of those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher safe that we cannot walk along. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >>> welcome back to "hardball," today, the president made subtle but clear note of the remarkable con influence that put the second inauguration of our first african american on the same day as the federal holiday marking dr. martin luther king's birthday. joining me now, the msnbc contributor, eugene robinson and author of barack obama, the story. let's start with you, david. and there's your
larry correia, thank you. >> it's been years since dr. martin luther king gave the "i have a dream" speech. and his niece, alvita king reflects on her uncle's legacy here in this landmark year when we return. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing e all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all wa
next, honoring dr. martin luther king junior. one of the largest celebrations held today in san francisco. >> and no holiday for the chp. >> we're heading to a town 49ers quarterback now put on the map. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ...and now... you! [ giggles ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> largest bay area bathering to honor dr. martin luther king junior was held today that. is where we heather. >> at center stage, leaders read excerpts of the writing autos one day right there in alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little whilt boys and little white girls as sisters and brothers. >> the reverend bring morz than average connection to the legacy. his mother was a young schoolteacher when she marched with king in alabama. today, it's an emotional one for her. >> it's just overwhelming to see how far we've come what. we've accomplished you know? we have a ways to go. >> there is still injustice a
on two bibles, president lincoln's and dr. martin luther king's, and this time, it was the president who seemed to swallow a word. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> reporter: and then, the president's address, just shy of 19 minutes, with a theme of moving forward together. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it, so long as we seize it together. together. together. together. >> reporter: the first president ever to include gays in his inaugural, while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president insisting we address climate change, and on immigration, arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our work force, rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: were there powerful performances, kelly clarkson's stirring rendition of "my country tis of thee." ♪ to thee we sing >> reporter: beyonce retu
? >> our killer cat. >> several events held in the bay area to commemorate the birthday of dr. martin luther king. what billed as oldest continuous king celebration in the east bay kicked off this morning. themes associated with dr. king, people found it special to celebrate on the second inauguration of the nation's first black president. san francisco commemoration took place at yerba buena center for the arts today. >> common message, how much further there is to go. reverend carolyn scott calls it dream almost fulfilled. >> we are more united. we're more caring. and more transparent. however... we do still need to continue the growth. >> leaders from different faiths read from the writings. >> right there in alabama little black boys and little black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and little white girls as sisters and brother autos the reverend brings more than the average connection to this regular gassy. his mother was a young schoolteacher in alabama. today, it's an emotional one for her. >> it's just overwhelming to see how far we've come. what we've a
as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the king legacy and yet i felt that there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me. and how i got involved in this journey of editing kinks papers. >> host: it's an excellent read and you and i are of the same generation and i too was coming-of-age in the 60s. and the book i must say was bittersweet for me because i guess week because they knew dr. came. he was my mentor and i knew in the last two years of my life in bitter because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i guess we can start at the beginning he caused at the beginning of your book you are run the mall with dr. came and ere the end of your book you are on the mall again 50 year
your life, and you also cover new insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write something for the anniversary and this is 50 years of my life and king's legacy and my life coincides with my coming of age, so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt that my life had been connected to the king legacy, and i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing team newspapers. >> host: its an excellent reading and you and buy your of the same generation, and why too was coming of age in the 60's. the book i might say was bittersweet to me because i knew dr. king, i knew him the last two years of his life and i am bitter because of the way that he was taken from us because of hatred in this country. i guess we can start at the beginning because the beginning of the but you were on the mall with dr. king and near the end you are near the mall again 50 years later with a monu
cho, guys, thanks so very much. that's the dr. martin luther king float going right past the reviewing stand right now. the float's design featuring an image of dr. king and a representation of his quote, out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope. martin luther king jr. float on this martin luther king day. appropriate, appropriate float. as we watch what's going on. there's the president. he's with some of the tuskegee airmen being honored right now. our own fredricka whitfield, by the way, her dad, a tuskegee airman. one of the heroes of world war ii. who went in, fought for all of us against the nazis in europe. did brilliantly, even though they got inferior equipment. they really managed to become heroes. they're being well recognized, as they should be. >> a very special moment, president obama spending time with them. i do notice, it does appear as if the first lady, as well as malia and sasha have gone back into the residence. they seem to have left the reviewing stand. so the president is there. you also see the vice president biden and his family all still there as well.
of service four years ago as a way to honor the spirit of dr. martin luther king jr.'s work. and our suzanne malveaux is at the national service event on the national mall. good morning to you. what have you seen there so far this morning? >> reporter: good morning. i guess i got a little lucky here. i was told i was going to be outdoors, but i'm inside this warm, beautiful tent. there are hundreds of people who are here gathered all to learn about community service. in this tent now, you might be hearing or even able to see if you've got a camera craned on the gospel great yolanda adams who's performing now. she's one of many of the superstars who have gathered here to call awareness to the importance of veering. now earl -- volunteering. now earlier we saw eva longoria. she talked about the need and her own foundation to give back to the latino community. we heard about giving back to military families. and then of course one of the co-chairs of this event, chelsea clinton, a lot of people got very excited about her. and she mentioned a couple of things. first of all, she said that she was
. not far from where dr. martin luther king gave his historic "i have a dream" speech back in 1963 right here on the national mall. in just moments from now i'll be joined by clarence jones. he is a close, personal friend of mlk and a contributor on that very speech. and he will tell us what he wants to see from president obama's speech, his inaugural speech coming up on monday. >>> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and
of rhetoric. >> let me say this. this is the anniversary year of the march on washington, dr. martin luther king, who his holiday will be on monday when the president is inaugurated. in the famous speech he made, i have a dream, he referred to a governor whose lips drifts with the words of interposition and nullification. that is the words that we're hearing dripping from lips today. interposition and nullification. maybe when they said the president was trying to be a king, maybe they were talking about martin luther king. toure, david, thanks for your time tonight. and be sure to catch toure on "the cycle." >>> coming up, it's day 2 of the big gop unity retreat. a time for change. new blood. but why in the world are republicans asking paul ryan for advice on beating president obama? >>> and as the president surges in this second term, we have news tonight about the birther movement. and it might surprise you. >>> plus, 50 years since civil rights leader medgar evers was murdered. his legacy is living on through his wife. and i counted the civil rights movement. evers has a big moment at t
in the past. particularly the one for which the man was honored today dr. martin luther king was so famous and civil rights. in fact civil rights for gays was a centerpiece of the president wants speech today. he said more about it than any president in a presidential address. while is he preoccupied with social justice that's in part because these other issues that you spoke about, invog gore rating the economy which has had such anemic recovery and dealing with the burgeoning deficits and exploding national debt are issues that don't particularly interest him. i'm not sure that the economy ever has. you may recall when he first took office he got through congress this stimulus package which was kind of a grab bag of spending of all kinds favored by members of his party in congress and then he basically abandoned the issue to take on something that i think appealed to him much more, that being the reform of the healthcare system. known as obama care which was adding another entitlement. >> >> bill: let me stop you there you would agree with me that president obama is a i have intelligent
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
also simultaneously have been the abortion president. dr. king, niece of the late dr. martin luther king, who had two abortions but is now solidly pro-life said in one of her speeches, and i quote her, my uncle matter-a dream. she said he dreamt that we would live out that which is self-evident, that all men are created equal. he called on america to turn from wrongs. today i call on all of us, dr. king says, regardless of nationality, race or religion to admit our wrongs and turn from them. i believe that the denial of the right to life is the greatest injustice we face in the world today. there is no compassion in killing, she sails. there is no justice in writing people out of the human race. history, mr. speaker, will not look favorably on today's abortion culture. we must indeed and instead work tirelessly to replace it with a culture of life. i would like to now yield to my good friend and colleague, macha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. -- marsha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker, and i thank the gentleman from ne
mentoring month during which we will celebrate the martin luther king jr. national day of service, giving all americans the opportunity to answer dr. king's important question, what are you doing for others? today i would like to recognize an exceptional minnesota organization that has become known as a national model for excellence in mentoring and service. it's the mentoring partnership, who works with hundreds of minnesotan organizations to pair up mentors with men tees and help strengthen relationships and build stronger demuents. every child deserves a mentor -- communities. every child deserves a mentor. the number one indicator of success for a child is a good relationship with a caring adult. they provide care and support, advice and words of encouragement. dr. king often spoke of his mentors and likewise became one himself to many americans. let's use this day of celebration on martin luther king day and national mentoring month as an opportunity to become a mentor or simply thank those who may have served as a mentor to yourself. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentle
that belonged to his in-laws, the bible used by abraham lincoln, the bible that dr. martin luther king carried with him during his travels and hosa parks' bible that she owned as a civil rights activist? >> rosa parks. >> yes. you're right. you're right. >> wow. congratulations. okay. so that's the one that won't be, but the other three will. >> he is using the in-laws' family bible in a small ceremony on monday. he is stacking the lincoln and martin luther king bibles. >> let's go back across to kath. we have kim kardashian with us, and it's her birthday from los angeles. who was the first president to be sworn in by a woman. president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot
celebrate, and commemorate the legacy of martin luther king jr. dr. king would have us to do that. do what is right. what is fair, and what is just. he must lead this country and help lead the world for a more peaceful place. >> take us back 50 years, miss evers-williams. i think in a very bitterly divided congress people feel often -- look at the polls, people feel angry, hostile, and very divided about the direction that the country is going. so 50 years ago, was it worse? was it less divided? better? >> i think it was certainly divided. whether it was worse then, compared to now, i guess i would have to say yes, because so many lives were lost. and we know about that, and the challenges. but we still find little bits of that scattered throughout the country. >> what do you mean? >> well, my native state of mississippi, there have been killings there over the last year, that were certainly racial oriented. we can look at the hiring of jobs, we can look at people who wanted to vote and who had difficulty getting to the polls. what-not. it seems kind of changed. some of it remains the same
section of history. martin luther king day. he invited me as president of the national action, presidents of the urban league and president of naacp, all these events and martin luther king's son. it was his way of recognizes dr. king's birthday and commitment to that agenda. we were at the church service and the agenda i don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his
ceremony on martin luther king employing bibles by martin luther king and president lincoln. an address down the mall toward lincoln's memorial where dr. king gave his most famous speech. to spell out the country his vision for the next four years. it is america's quadrennial celebration of the office of the presidency, the orderly transition of power, the luminaries, the singers, the salutes, the speech, the pomp, the circumstance, the second inauguration of president barack obama starts right now. >>> welcome to washington. it is chilly but frankly bearable outside as the country prepares to celebrate the peaceful maintenance of power, the transferns of power from the first term administration of president barack obama to his second term administration. the president was officially sworn in by chief justice john roberts yesterday at the blue room at the white house as the first lady and the obama daughters looked on. but in the little less than two hours the president will affirm that oath before a much larger crowd with 100% more pomp and an equal proportion of circumstance. we have
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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